Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Pluck, Volumes 1 & 2

Here are two compilations of instrumental music that I put together, mainly of acoustic guitar, but I made sure to include some electric sounds as well as other plucked instruments such as the ukulele, bouzouki, mandolin, veena, sitar, harp, and lute... hence the name "Pluck."

Download Vol. 1 here (no password):
http://www.mediafire.com/?myarugpx2qtjl4v

Download Vol. 2 here (still no password):
http://www.mediafire.com/?zqd30uxzrhdv96z

Hope you enjoy - a little bit of all styles here, but I made sure the flow is good overall.

Cheers,
Angus

1 comment:

Angus said...

Providing liner notes for every song would be a big chore, but let me mention a few things. Jake Shimabukuro plays ukulele (mind-bendingly well!), Nancy Allen the harp, Dave Grisman the mandolin. The instrument on the Danú recording is the bouzouki, which is a lot like a deep sounding mandolin. Ravi Shankar plays the sitar, of course; his song has other wild sounds in it. Veena player Ramachandra Iyer was in his seventies when he recorded "Sarasiruha," which is featured in an academic compilation called Worlds of Music. This is South Indian (Carnatic) classical music, which begins with an alap (improvisation), becomes more rhythmic, then moves to the kriti (set composition where the drums kick in), and the pallavi and anupallavi, parts of the kriti. Listening to this piece in an ethnomusicology class was an awesome experience for me. You can even hear a dog barking in the background, so you know this was recorded on site.

Julian Bream features three times - twice in the guitar pieces by Mudarra and Villa-Lobos, and then again on lute in "Grimstock." There's some Jansch and Rebourn, swing and jazz... I left out John McLaughlin for some reason, probably because many of his great pieces are longer in length... same goes with The Allman Brothers' "Mountain Jam" from Live at Ludlow Garage, which is over forty minutes long. I will say, if you like the Indian sound, McLaughlin's performances in the mid-1970s with Shakti contain some of the finest guitar work I've ever heard.

I left the banjo out this time around, so let me give a link to "Angeline the Baker" on clawhammer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFxt2YbDWkY

Video quality is poor, and it's not the only version out there, but the girl is cute.